MYANMARPEDIA

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37 Nats

Posted by myanmarpedia on September 27, 2007

No. 1. Thagyá nat No. 2. Mahágirí nat

No.1 [Thagyá nat] No. 2. Mahágirí nat. One Nga Tindaw, a blacksmith of Yetaung on the Irrawaddy, not far north of Prome, had a son named Nga Tindè and two daughters named Mà Sawmè and Mà Dwé-hlá. Nga Tindè was a man of great strength, said in the Annals of Tagaung to be able to wield a hammer weighing 60 viss (210 lbs.). The noise of his anvil was heard in the king's palace, and the king ordered the valiant blacksmith to be brought before him, but he fled into the jungle. So the king married his sister Mà Sawmè, to whom he gave the title of Thíriwundá, and made her his chief queen, and then persuaded Nga Tindè to return, on a promise of making him a high official. But when Nga Tindè did return he was tied to a jasmine tree (sagábin) and burnt alive. After his death, Nga Tindè became a Nat and has ever since been worshipped with offerings at a yearly festival in December. This Nat is represented standing in Court dress of a high class, with and without the official head-dress, with a drawn sword and fan; supported by three balús on a kneelilng or standing elephants.

No. 3. Hnamádawgyí Nat No. 4. Shwe Nabé Nat

No. 3. Hnamádawgyí Nat, also known as Shwé Myet-hná Nat, or Golden-cheeks, and Taung-gyí Shin Nat. When Mà Sawmè, as Queen Thíriwundá, heard that her brother was being burnt in the jasmine tree, she rushed into the fire, and all the king could save of her was her head. After death, she and her brother lived in the jasmine (michelia champaca) as Nats at Tagaung, where they did much harm to the people. So the king had the tree felled and thrown into the river. It floated down to Pagán, where it grounded near the Kuppayawgá Gate. It was taken out of the river by Thalakhyaung Min (i.e., Thinlígyaung-ngè of Pagán, 520-529 A.D.), who took it to the Pópá Mountain, where I [Temple R.C.] am assured that their heads in gold are still to be seen. Their festival is in December. This Nat is represented as a woman, standing in Court dress of a high class, sometimes with a nagá (serpent) head-dress, supported by a balú on a kneelling or standing elephant. No. 4. Shwe Nabé Nat. She was born at Mindón and was the daughter of the Sea-serpent (Yénagá). She went to worship at a footprint of Gaudama (Buddha) in the form of a woman. Here she met Nga Tindè, while he was hiding in the jungle, and became his wife. They had two sons, Taungmagyí and Myauk Minshinbyú. She died of grief at her husband's failure to return to her after he had started to visit his sister at Tahaung. This Nat is represented as a girl standing on a lotus throne, in Court dress of a high class, with a nagá head-dress.

No. 5. Thónban Nat No. 6. Taung-ngú Mingaung Nat

No. 5. Thónban Nat, also known as Thónban-hlá Nat, Surpassing Beauty. She was born at Hantháwadí (Pegu) and was able to change her form three times a day. She was taken to King Duttabaung of Thírikhettayá (Prome), who had heard of her beauty. But his queens bribed the officers to say that she was a giantess and so big that the palace gates would have to be widened to admit her. So he ordered that she was to be kept in a large house outside the gate, where she earned a livelihood as a weaver. Here she built a pagoda called Limmàgyí Phayá, and planted a tree, known as the Limmàgyíbin. She was thus deserted by her husband, and after death her loom and its belongings turned into a rock, which is still to be seen. Her title as queen was Okkalábá. This Nat is represented as a girl, standing in the Court dress of a royal attendant, with and without the nagá head-dress, supported by a Burmanised representation of the Brahmanic elephant-headed god Ganésa, kneeling or standing on a balú driving a standing elephant. The Indian origin of this cult is therefore obvious.
No. 6. Taung-ngú Mingaung Nat, also called Shinbayin Nat. He was king of Taung-ngú (Tonghoo), and was known as Kuthén Thaken (Lord of Bassein), son of Minyè Théngáthú by a mother who was a native of Kadú in the Shwébó district. He was seized with dysentery and went to the Paung-laung (Sittang) river to get his health restored, but died on his return from the unlucky smell of onions. This Nat is represented as seated on a lotus throne, in high class Court dress, with a fan in his right hand.

No. 7. Mintárá Nat No. 8. Thandawgán Nat

No. 7. Mintárá Nat, called also Mintarágyí Nat. He was the son of Sinbyúshin Mintarágyí, and the elder brother of Mingaung-gyí of Ava. He died of fever and became a Nat. He is represented seated on a lotus throne, with a fan, in full high class Court costume, winged in the Yódayá, i.e., Siamese, fashion. No. 8. Thandawgán Nat, called also Yébyá Nat. He was an assistant secretary to Mingaung, King of Tonghoo, and died from snake bite while plucking jasmine flowers for the king. This Nat is represented in the Court dress of an ordinary official with a fan, seated on a lotus throne.

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No. 9. Shwé Nawrathá Nat. No. 10. Aungzwámagyí Nat

No. 9. Shwé Nawrathá Nat. He was the son of Mingbyaing Màthíríthú and grandson of the second Mingaung of Ava. During the reign of his uncle, Shwé Nàngyaw, one of his servants, Nga Thaukkyá, rebelled. On this account, Shwé Nawrathà was thrown into the Irrawaddy and became a Nat. This Nat is represented in high class Court dress, seated on a lotus throne, as a Manipúrí, with polo mallet and ball. The modern English game of polo came from the Manipúrís through English officers in quite recent times. No. 10. Aungzwámagyí Nat. One Nga Saung-gyàn raised a rebellion at Ngasingú, about six miles to the north of Mandalay, against Min Narathéngá, king of Pagán, and the king sent his younger brother, Narabadísíthú, against him, in the hope that his brother might be killed, so that he might marry his widow, i.e., his sister-in-law, the Wálúwadí Princess. So Narabadísíthú left his servant, Nga Aungzwá, behind, with a promise that if he could kill the king, he should be married to the widow. The king was duly despatched, and Nga Aungzwá demanded fulfilment of his promise, but the lady flatly refused to marry him, as he was not of the blood royal. When Nga Aungzwá was told of this, he spat on the flor, and used some strong language about the fulfilment of promises. The new king, being enraged at this, had him put to death, whereon he became a Nat. This Nat, who is very popular, is represented as a young man in high class Court costume, with a sword in the right hand, riding quietly.

No. 11. Ngázíshin Nat No. 12. Aungbinlè Sinbyushin Nat

No. 11. Ngázíshin Nat, Lord of the Five (White) Elephants, called also Ngágyaung Tagá Nat. Kyawzwá, King of Pinlè, was the son of King Thíháthú and procured five white elephants from over the sea. He died of fever and became a Nat. This Nat is represented as a royal figure in Court dress seated on a lotus, with a sword in the right hand, four umbrellas over him, and royal spittoon and betel box before him. He is supported by a five-headed elephant, which has four pots for offerings between the heads. All these accumulated insignia of royalty refer to the claim of this king in life to a descent from all the royal lines existing in his time. He is, however, sometimes represented merely as a royal soldier youth seated on a five-headed elephant, with a sword in the left hand. No. 12. Aungbinlè Sinbyushin Nat. Thíháthú, King of Amarapúra, was the son of King Mingaung, He was killed in some rice land near the Aungbinlé Lake by the Kóngbaung Sawbwá and became a Nat. This Nat is represented standing or sitting on a lotus, or on a throne, in Court dress, with a swish or fan in the left hand; supported on a one-headed or three-headed elephant, in token of his royalty , do doubt. He is sometimes accompanied by a driver or mahaut in front, and a balú armed, or simply an attendant, behind.

No. 13. Taungmagyí Nat and No. 14. Maung Minshin Nat

No. 13. Taungmagyí Nat and No. 14. Maung Minshin Nat, also known as Maung Shinbyú Nat and Taungmàgyí Myauk Minshinbyú Nat. Nga Tindè's serpent wife brougnt forth two eggs near the Munlé River, which were found by a hermit and taken home. After a while, two boys came forth out of the two eggs, and were called Shinbyú and Shin-nyó. King Duttabaung of Prome was told by his Brahman astrologers that two powerful men would soon be forthcoming to overthrow him, and so he had a search made for them. They were brougnt to him by a hunter, and he ordered them to fight out a boxingh-match, possibly as a measure of policy. During the struggle, the younger of the brothers died and became the Nat Taungmàgyí, while the elder one died soon afterwards and became the Nat Shinbyú or Maung Minshin, showing the wisdom of the policy. They were each said to have six hands, and there are figures of them set up to the east of Prome, under the name of Kúdaw Shin. This pair of Nats are represented as a couple of soldiers standing on lotus thrones in Court costume. The arms in each case hold a quoit, a dah or sword, and a couple of spears. The six arms plainly show the Indian origin of the cult of the pair.

No.15. Shindaw Nat No. 16. Nyaung-gyin Nat

No.15. Shindaw Nat. He was a young prince placed by the king of Ava under the abbot of the Hnatpyittaung Payá to be educated at his monastery. While still a novice, he died of snakebite. This Nat is represented as a novice, with rosary and fan, telling his beads. No. 16. Nyaung-gyin Nat, called also Nyaung-gyin O Nat. He was a member of Manuhà's family and died of leprosy in the days of Anawratházaw. This Nat is represented as a leper in high -class Court dress leaning of a staff. He has lost the ends of both fingers and toes, and his face is marked with the usual signs of tubercular leprosy.

No. 17. Tabìn Shwédí Nat No. 18. Minyè Aungdin Nat

No. 17. Tabìn Shwédí Nat. He was king of Tonghoo and Hantháwadí (Pegu) and son of Mín Kínyó. His Minister, Thamin Sawdók, warned him of ill-fortune and advised him to remove his residence. This he did, but, nevertheless, he was killed by his royal sword-bearer (kalut-le'wèdá-hmú), who was the younger brother of Thamin Sawdók, and became a Nat. This Nat is represented as seated on a lotus throne, in Court dress, with and without wings, with a sword in his right hand. No. 18. Minyè Aungdin Nat, called also Minyè Aung Nat. He was the son of Anauk Thalón Mintarágyí, and died of drink. This Nat is represented as a young man seated on a lotus on a throne, or on a lotus throne, in high class Court dress, playing on the Burmese harp.

No. 19. Shwé Sippin Nat No. 20. Mèdaw Shwésagá Nat

No. 19. Shwé Sippin Nat, also called Shwé Sit-thí Nat. His title was the Hlaingdet Myózá and he was the son of Sawmun-hnit, king of Pagán. He was sent to suppress the insurrection of Kyaing-thin, son of the Pagán Sawbwá, but spent the time in cock-fighting, and so was put to death by having his legs buried in the earth and being left to die. He became a Nat. This Nat is represented seated on a lotus throne in high class Court dress, with sword uplifted or over his shoulder in his right hand. No. 20. Mèdaw Shwésagá Nat. She was the mother of the Hlaingdet Myózá, who became the Shwé Sippin Nat, and died of grief at the terrible end of her son. She became a Nat also. This Nat is represented as a girl in full Court dress, with and without the nagá head-dress, kneeling on a lotus throne, or on a lotus, with her elbow in the fashionable state of dislocation.

No. 21. Maung Pó Tú Nat No. No. 22. Yun Bayìn Nat

21. Maung Pó Tú Nat. He was a trader of Pinyá, and was killed by a tiger on the summit of Mt. Ongyaw whilst on his way home. He is, however, represented as riding a tiger, or what may pass for a tiger, and driving it with a stick, in a Court costume, proper for a very high official, or for a prince of the royal family. There is, perhaps, therefore, some legend giving him a royal parentage or connection.. No. 22. Yun Bayìn Nat. He was the Chief of Zimmè and was made a prisoner of war by Sinbyúmyáshin of Hantháwadí (Pegu). He died at Rangoon of dysentery in 920 B.E. (1558 A.D.), and became a Nat. This Nat is represented seated on a throne, or on a lotus throne, in high class Court dress, with a sheathed sword.

No. 23. Maung Minbyú Nat No. 24. Mándalé Bódaw Nat

No. 23. Maung Minbyú Nat. He was a prince of Ava and married the daughter of a cavalry officer. He died of an overdose of opium. This Nat is represented as a young man seated on a lotus throne, or on a lotus on a throne, in high class Court dress, playing on a horn or pipe. No. 24. Mándalé Bódaw Nat, called also Kyet Yók Nat, No. 25. Shwébyin Naungdaw Nat (the elder Shwébyin Nat), No. 26. Shwébyin Nyídaw Nat (the younger Shwébyin Nat). The two Shwébyin were brothers and the sons of a native of India (in the service of King Anawratházaw) by an ogress he met with on Mt. Pópá, whither he had been sent to get certain flowers for the king. They also served under the king and were sent by him to China for the holy tooth-relic from the royal palace there. They returned with the relic and the king erected a pagoda for it, requiring a brick from each of his officers. The two Shwébyin failed to supply a brick each, were killed by being castrated and became Nats. Mandalé Bódaw was the title of a minister of Anawratházaw, who was a Brahman and the guardian of the two Shwébyin. He was killed together with them. He tried to get away on a marble elephant, which he could vivify by placing an enchanted white thread round it, but failed and was captured and killed. All three became Nats. In this case the Mandalé Bodaw Nat is represented standing on a lotus throne in the full official Court dress of a minister of the king. He bears a sword, and his right hand is in the conventional attitude of preaching. This appears to refer to his dual character as a warrior and a priest. The two Shwébyin brothers are in the Court dress of officials, seated on lotus thrones, and bearing swords in the right hand or in the right and left hands respectively.

No. 25. Shwébyin Naungdaw Nat No. 26. Shwébyin Nyídaw Nat

No. 24. Mándalé Bódaw Nat, called also Kyet Yók Nat, ] No. 25. Shwébyin Naungdaw Nat (the elder Shwébyin Nat), No. 26. Shwébyin Nyídaw Nat (the younger Shwébyin Nat). The two Shwébyin were brothers and the sons of a native of India (in the service of King Anawratházaw) by an ogress he met with on Mt. Pópá, whither he had been sent to get certain flowers for the king. They also served under the king and were sent by him to China for the holy tooth-relic from the royal palace there. They returned with the relic and the king erected a pagoda for it, requiring a brick from each of his officers. The two Shwébyin failed to supply a brick each, were killed by being castrated and became Nats. Mandalé Bódaw was the title of a minister of Anawratházaw, who was a Brahman and the guardian of the two Shwébyin. He was killed together with them. He tried to get away on a marble elephant, which he could vivify by placing an enchanted white thread round it, but failed and was captured and killed. All three became Nats. In this case the Mandalé Bodaw Nat is represented standing on a lotus throne in the full official Court dress of a minister of the king. He bears a sword, and his right hand is in the conventional attitude of preaching. This appears to refer to his dual character as a warrior and a priest. The two Shwébyin brothers are in the Court dress of officials, seated on lotus thrones, and bearing swords in the right hand or in the right and left hands respectively.

No. 27. Mintná Maung Shin Nat No. 28. Tíbyusaung Nat

No. 27. Mintná Maung Shin Nat. Maung Shin was the son of Min Yinzaw of Pagán and settled in Kyauk-thànbauk and Pabetmyó. He died from an accidental fall from a swing while at play. This Nat is represented in Court dress, seated on a lotus throne and playing the Burmese harp. No. 28. Tíbyusaung Nat, No. 29. Tíbyusaung Mèdaw Nat, and No. 30. Yómàshin Mingaung Nat, called also Bayinmàshin Nat. Kyaungbyú Min had, among others, theree sons: two by one queen, named Kyízó and Súkadè, and the great king Anawratházaw by another queen. Anawratházaw was much younger than the other two. Kyízó and Súkadè dethroned their father in 348 B.E. (986 A.D.) and Kyízó became king. He was a mighty hunter, pitching his camp at Nyundun on the Chindwin. When twenty-eight years of age he was accidentally killed at Pagyí, near Mt. Pópá, by an arrow from an huntsman and became the Yómàshin Mingaung Nat. And so, in 354 B.E. (992 A.D.), Súkadé became king and married his step-mother, who was the mother of Anawratházaw rebelled against Súkadé, who was killed by a lance. When Kyaungbyú Min was dethroned, his family were sent to a monastery, and the king himself was forced to turn monk. On his death Súkadé became the Tibyúsaung Nat. The mother of the above Nats became the Tibyúsaung Mèdaw Nat. Her votaries are women, who carry a rosary and wear a golden head-dress. In this case, Tibyúsaung Nat is represented, both as a young and as an old man, in the costume of a daukchá yathé, or what purports to be such, seated on a lotus throne. Tibyúsaung Mèdaw Nat is represented as a girl kneeling in full Court dress on a lotus or on a lotus throne. The outward turned elbow is an accomplishment of which Burmese young ladies are very proud. Bayinmáshin Mingaung Nat is seated on a lotus throne in full Court dress of a high class, and sometimes with a bow unstrung.

No. 29. Tíbyusaung Mèdaw Nat No. 30. Yómàshin Mingaung Nat

No. 29. Tíbyusaung Mèdaw Nat, and No. 30. Yómàshin Mingaung Nat, called also Bayinmàshin Nat. Kyaungbyú Min had, among others, three sons: two by one queen, named Kyízó and Súkadè, and the great king Anawratházaw by another queen. Anawratházaw was much younger than the other two. Kyízó and Súkadè dethroned their father in 348 B.E. (986 A.D.) and Kyízó became king. He was a mighty hunter, pitching his camp at Nyundun on the Chindwin. When twenty-eight years of age he was accidentally killed at Pagyí, near Mt. Pópá, by an arrow from an huntsman and became the Yómàshin Mingaung Nat. And so, in 354 B.E. (992 A.D.), Súkadé became king and married his step-mother, who was the mother of Anawratházaw rebelled against Súkadé, who was killed by a lance. When Kyaungbyú Min was dethroned, his family were sent to a monastery, and the king himself was forced to turn monk. On his death Súkadé became the Tibyúsaung Nat. The mother of the above Nats became the Tibyúsaung Mèdaw Nat. Her votaries are women, who carry a rosary and wear a golden head-dress. In this case, Tibyúsaung Nat is represented, both as a young and as an old man, in the costume of a daukchá yathé, or what purports to be such, seated on a lotus throne. Tibyúsaung Mèdaw Nat is represented as a girl kneeling in full Court dress on a lotus or on a lotus throne. The outward turned elbow is an accomplishment of which Burmese young ladies are very proud. Bayinmáshin Mingaung Nat is seated on a lotus throne in full Court dress of a high class, and sometimes with a bow unstrung.

No. 31. Min Síthú Nat and No. 32. Min Kyawzwá Nat

No. 31. Min Síthú Nat and No. 32. Min Kyawzwá Nat. King Thénzwin of Pagán had two sons by his Northern Queen, the Anauk Míbayá, named Síthú and Kyawzwá. He determined to make another son, Shwé Laung, his heir, and in order to avert danger from him in consequence, he sent the brothers, Síthú and Kyawzwá, to suppress the Karens on the Taung-ngú [Tonghoo] border, which service they performed with great success. Subsequently, they made a great dyke to drain the Myaungdú village, founded by Min Nyénaung, and quarrelled over turning water into it; whereupon Síthú killed his younger brother, Kyawzwá, who became a Nat, and revenged himself by afterwards doing Síthú to death by enchantments. Síthú in his turn became a Nat, too. There is another legend, which makes out Min Síthú Nat to be Alaungsíthú, son of King Shwégú-dáraká of Pagán. The Nat Min Síthú is represented as a young man in high class Court dress, seated on a lotus throne in the attitude of preaching; and the Nat Min Kyawzwá as a young man in high class Court dress, riding violently.

No. 33. Myaukpet Shinmá Nat No. 34. Anauk Míbayá Nat

No. 33. Myaukpet Shinmá Nat. She was the wife of Minyé Théngáthú, the keeper of the king's golden umbrella. She died in childbirth near Sagaing, on her way to visit her parents, and her child, a boy, was taken to his father at Tonghoo, and became King Mingaung on the death of King Tabin Shwédí. On his own death he, too, became a Nat. This Nat is represented as a young girl, but also as an old woman, kneeling in Court dress on a lotus throne, or on a lotus on a throne. No. 34. Anauk Míbayá Nat, the Northern Queen. She was the mother of the Nats, Min Síthú and Min Kyawzwá. She was frightened to death on meeting Min Kyawzwá, after he had become a Nat, on a pony, while amusing herself in a cotton field near Ava. Another legend says she was the wife of Mingaung-gyí, son of Mingyízwa. This Nat is represented as a young woman in Court costume, sitting or kneeling on a lotus throne and suckling an infant.

No. 35. Shingón NatNo. No. 36. Shingwá Nat

35. Shingón Nat. She was a concubine of Sinbyúshin Thíháthú, who died suddenly at Ava, on returning from a trip to the Aungbinlè Lake, and became a Nat. She is represented as a young girl standing on a lotus throne or an a lotus on a throne, in the Court costume of a royal attendant, and in the attitude of obeisance. No. 36. Shingwá Nat. She was the sister of the Mandalé Bódaw and was killed at the same time, becomingf a Nat. This Nat is represented as a young girl in Court dress, standing on a lotus throne or on a lotus on a throne.

No.37. Shin-nèmí Nat

No. 37. Shin-nèmí Nat. She was the daughter of Queen Okkalábá, otherwise known as Thónbàn-hlá, and died at the same time as her mother at Tabauk Tawyet and became a Nat. This Nat is represented as a stout girl, with nagá head-dress, standing in ordinary Court dress.

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